LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE AND MIGRATION

Instructor: Álvaro Fernández Bravo

Classes on Mondays & Tuesdays

Students Level of Spanish: advanced

Days:  Mondays & Tuesdays, 6:30-8:00 PM EST

Classes are online synchronic via Google Meet, once a week, 1.5 hours each. 

Course description.

Migration processes can be approached through visual and verbal sources. This course proposes to visit a set of literary and journalistic texts, films, works of art, podcasts, series and songs that address the problem of Latin American migration from various angles: emigration to destinations outside the continent, internal immigration between American countries and also the processes of immigration to Latin America from Europe, Asia and Africa.

Some of the sources reviewed in the course include stories by Eduardo Halfon, poems by Cristina Peri Rossi and José Watanabe, the novel Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli, the film Nostalgia de la luz by Patricio Guzmán, and the series Rompan todo by Gustavo Santaolalla (on Netflix). The course includes the practice of reading, hearing, and seeing Spanish, as well as the production of written texts in Spanish and the practice of conversation in Spanish.

About Álvaro Fernández Bravo 

Álvaro Fernández Bravo, PhD has extensive experience as Professor of Latin American Literature and Spanish Language. He received his PhD and MA at Princeton University and a Licenciatura en Letras at University of Buenos Aires. He was Director of New York University Buenos Aires (2008-2013) and Academic Director at OPI (Oficina de Programas Internacionales), Universidad de San Andrés (2004-08). He is Director of EspacioCultura. Online workshops on Latin American Culture and Spanish Language.

Students Level of Spanish: advanced

Days:  Mondays & Tuesdays,  6:30-8:00 PM EST,  4:30-6:00 PM PST

Classes are online synchronic via Google Meet, once a week, 1.5 hours each. 

 

 

Course description.

 

Migration processes can be approached through visual and verbal sources. This course proposes to visit a set of literary and journalistic texts, films, works of art, podcasts, series and songs that address the problem of Latin American migration from various angles: emigration to destinations outside the continent, internal immigration between American countries and also the processes of immigration to Latin America from Europe, Asia and Africa.

Some of the sources reviewed in the course include stories by Eduardo Halfon, poems by Cristina Peri Rossi and José Watanabe, the novel Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli, the film Nostalgia de la luz by Patricio Guzmán, and the series Rompan todo by Gustavo Santaolalla (on Netflix). The course includes the practice of reading, hearing, and seeing Spanish, as well as the production of written texts in Spanish and the practice of conversation in Spanish.

 

About Álvaro Fernández Bravo 

 

Álvaro Fernández Bravo, PhD has extensive experience as Professor of Latin American Literature and Spanish Language. He received his PhD and MA at Princeton University and a Licenciatura en Letras at University of Buenos Aires. He was Director of New York University Buenos Aires (2008-2013) and Academic Director at OPI (Oficina de Programas Internacionales), Universidad de San Andrés (2004-08). He is Director of EspacioCultura. Online workshops on Latin American Culture and Spanish Language.

 

OUR METHOD

We teach culture with solid, fun, and experienced faculty. Learn Latin American literature, art, music, and society with the best professors in a relaxed and casual atmosphere where you can practice and improve your language skills while having a good time.

Each #online workshop  is designed for students with intermediate or advanced knowledge of Spanish. It is organized around four abilities: reading (fiction, poetry, essay, non-fiction); listening (films, videos, songs, and podcasts); speaking through in-class discussion; and the practice of writing and translation.

Classes are online synchronic via Google Meet, once a week, 1.5 hours each. The first class is for free.

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